Resolve to improve your sleep in 2019. Image of a woman sleeping on a bed with www.troublesleeping.co.uk logo

Make Sleep Your 2019 Resolution

Image of a champagne bottle and crystal glasses in an ice bucket.

With the dawn of a New Year, full of possibilities and opportunities, it is time to start thinking about what changes we want to make this year. 2019 New Year’s Resolutions!

Perhaps you want to lose a few pounds, get fit by going to the gym, stop smoking or cut down on your alcohol consumption…? They all sound good. However, there is one thing that you can (and should) do to improve your health that is arguably even more effective…

Getting a good night’s sleep:

Getting a good night’s sleep (ideally between 7-9 hours for a healthy adult) is one of the most effective single things you can do to boost your mental and physical health…

“But I am just a poor sleeper. There is nothing I can do about it.”

Wrong!

Resolve to improve your sleep in 2019. Image of a woman sleeping on a bed with www.troublesleeping.co.uk logo

Trouble Sleeping, run by Chartered Psychologist and sleep expert Dr Lindsay Browning, offers help for people of all ages with their sleeping issues: from babies to adults. Packages are available from only £99. Help is available face to face in Wokingham, Berkshire or via telephone or Skype anywhere.

Call 0118 9010544 today for a free 15 minute consultation and see if Trouble Sleeping can help you sleep better in 2019.

I would definitely recommend seeking advice from Dr Browning as her insight and knowledge has been incredibly useful to me.

Sam from Reading

Adults should get 7-9 hours of sleep per night

Ideally, adults should be getting between 7-9 hours of sleep every night. However, it is estimated that at least 35% of adults are not getting enough sleep.

35% of US adults are not getting the recommended 7 hours of sleep each night.
Did you get enough sleep last night?

 

Research in the Journal Sleep https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/40/10/zsx135/4056064, even goes so far as to suggest that both short (<6.5 hours) and long (≥9.5 hours) sleep were associated with higher mortality. That is, people who sleep for less than 6.5 hours a night, or more than 9.5 hours a night, are likely to die sooner than those who sleep the recommended 7-9 hours.

People who sleep for less than 6.5 hours a night, or more than 9.5 hours a night, are likely to die sooner than those who sleep the recommended 7-9 hours.

There are many reasons why people are not getting enough sleep. Stress and anxiety mean that it can be harder to get to sleep and stay asleep. Lifestyle factors, such as having electronic devices like phones, TVs and tablets in the bedroom can keep you awake. Also, social jet-lag, where people go to bed late and sleep-in at the weekend, but then go to bed and get up significantly earlier in the working week, can play havoc with sleep. This discrepancy in going to bed and waking times at the weekend compared to the working week is like giving yourself jet-lag, resulting in poorer sleep.

If you are not regularly getting 7 to 9 hours of sleep, you could try comparing your working week and weekend bedtime routines and look to go to bed and get up at regular times throughout the week.

If you are struggling with your sleep and would like to get some help then please contact Trouble Sleeping.

Top tips for a good night’s sleep

When you have a stressful life event it is perfectly normal to sleep poorly for a few nights. However, problems arise when this short term insomnia turns into long term (chronic) insomnia. This is when you may need to seek help.

  • Limit your use of computers, tablets and phones before going to bed, and do not have the devices next to your bed in the night.
  • Try to limit the amount of time you spend in bed not sleeping – instead try to leave the bed when you are awake in the night.
  • Try to get up at the same time every morning, and go to bed at the same time every night.
  • Increase the amount of exercise you do during the daytime.
  • Don’t drink alcohol to help you get to sleep, as it disrupts your sleep later in the night.
  • Limit your intake of caffeine – the stimulant can stay in your system for up to 8 hours.

If you feel that you would like some expert help, look at our services for adults and children.